2012

06.13.2012

As expected, when the Kansas state board of education heard a presentation about the current status of the Next Generation Science Standards on June 12, 2012, evolution was in the crosshairs.

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06.11.2012

Evolution is to be added to the primary national curriculum in England, gratifying scientists and educators who have been campaigning for its addition over the last three years.

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06.08.2012

NCSE is pleased to announce that the latest issue of Reports of the National Center for Science Education is now available on-line.

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06.08.2012

How can evolution be integrated throughout life science education? Thinking Evolutionarily, a new publication from the National Research Council and the National Academy of Sciences, reports on a recent meeting that addressed this vital question.

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06.07.2012

"Kansas is headed toward another debate over how evolution is taught in its public schools," the Associated Press (June 6, 2012) reports, "with a State Board of Education member saying Wednesday that science standards under development are 'very problematic' for describing the theory as a well-established, core scientific concept."

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06.05.2012

Friend of Darwin award recognizes lifetime evolution educator, young grassroots activist

 

It's an age-old story—the master and the newcomer. The expert who has devoted decades to keeping students on the right path. And the new kid who throws himself into the battle for truth, beauty, and the sheer joy of challenging the status quo.

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06.05.2012

Call 2012 the Year of the Copycat. Many of the antievolution bills proposed this year were old bills that were simply dusted off and offered up as new.

A 2011 Tennessee bill—largely drawn from Louisiana's infamous 2008 Science Education Act—was revived and signed into law in April. Among other things, this classic "academic freedom" bill lets teachers "help" students critique evolution, global warming, and more. This means there are now two states in the Union—Louisiana and Tennessee—that have anti-evolution and anti-climate change education laws on the books.

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06.05.2012

A creationist campaign to remove references to evolution from high school biology textbooks in South Korea succeeded in May 2012, according to a report in Nature (June 5, 2012), when "the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology revealed that many of the publishers would produce revised editions that exclude examples of the evolution of the horse or of avian ancestor Archaeopteryx."

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06.04.2012
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"Clashroom Clashes" — a two-part series by Carrie Madren posted on the American Association for the Advancement of Science's STEM.edu blog — "talks with middle and high school teachers across the country to find out what it's like to be on the frontlines of two often-controversial science topics — evolution and climate change — and how they deal with the pushback."

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06.01.2012

A new Gallup poll on public opinion about evolution suggests that the rate of acceptance of evolution in the United States is "essentially unchanged" over the years.

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